Dr. Alexander Schnegg - EPR Forschungsgruppe

Vita

Dipl.-Phys. Freie Universität Berlin (1998)
Dr. rer. nat.Institut für Experimentalphysik, Freie Universität Berlin (1999-2003)
PostdocMax-Planck-Institut für Bioanorganische Chemie; heute: MPI CEC (2004-2005)
PostdocHelmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie (HZB) (2006-2013)
Wiss. MitarbeiterVerantwortlicher Wissenschaftler im EPR-Labor am HZB (2013-2018)
Adjunct professor Monash University, Melbourne, Australia (seit 2016)
ForschungsgruppenleiterMPI CEC (seit 2018)
  

Publications

Full publications list

Selected MPI CEC publications

 

  • Tarrago, M., Römelt, C., Nehrkorn, J., Schnegg, A., Neese, F., Bill, E.,  Ye, S. (2021). Experimental and Theoretical Evidence for an Unusual Almost Triply Degenerate Electronic Ground State of Ferrous Tetraphenylporphyrin. Inorganic chemistry. doi:10.1021/acs.inorgchem.1c00031.
  • Nehrkorn, J. P., Greer, S. M., Malbrecht, B. J., Anderton, K. J., Azat Aliabadi, K., Schnegg, A.,  Holldack, K., Herrmann, C., Betley, T., Stoll, S., Hill, S. (2021). Spectroscopic Investigation of a Metal–Metal-Bonded Fe6 Single-Molecule Magnet with an Isolated S = 19/2 Giant-Spin Ground State. Inorganic Chemistry, (xxx), xxx-xxx. doi:10.1021/acs.inorgchem.0c03595.
  • Pavlov, A.A., Nehrkorn, J., Zubkevich, S.V., Fedin, M.V., Holldack, K., Schnegg, A., Novikov, V.V. (2020). A Synergy and Struggle of EPR, Magnetometry and NMR: A Case Study of Magnetic Interaction Parameters in a Six-Coordinate Cobalt(II) Complex Inorganic Chemistry 59(15), 10746-10755. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.inorgchem.0c01191
  • Viciano-Chumillas, M., Blondin, G., Clémanceym N., Krzystek, J., Ozerov, M., Armentano, D., Schnegg, A., Lohmiller, T., Telser, J., Lloret, F., Cano, J. (2020). Single‐Ion Magnetic Behaviour in an Iron(III) Porphyrin Complex: A Dichotomy Between High‐Spin and 5/2−3/2 Spin Admixture Chemistry – A European Journal 26(62), 14242-14251. https://doi.org/10.1002/chem.202003052
  • Jochim, A., Lohmiller, T., Rams, M., Böhme, M., Ceglarska, M., Schnegg, A., Plass, W., Näther, C. (2020). Influence of the Coligand onto the Magnetic Anisotropy and the Magnetic Behavior of One-Dimensional Coordination Polymers Inorganic Chemistry 59(13), 8971-8982. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.inorgchem.0c00815
  • Lin, Y.-H., Kutin, Y., van Gastel, M., Bill, E., Schnegg, A., Ye, S., Lee, W.-Z. (2020). A Manganese(IV)-Hydroperoxo Intermediate Generated by Protonation of the Corresponding Manganese(III)-Superoxo Complex Journal of the American Chemical Society. https://doi.org/10.1021/jacs.0c02756
  • Böhme, M., Jochim, A., Rams, M., Lohmiller, T., Suckert, S., Schnegg, A., Plass, W., Näther, C. (2020). Variation of the Chain Geometry in Isomeric 1D Co(NCS)2 Coordination Polymers and Their Influence on the Magnetic Properties Inorganic Chemistry 59(8), 5325-5338. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.inorgchem.9b03357
  • Ma, Y., Pang, Y., Chabbra, S., Reijerse, E.J., Schnegg, A., Niski, J., Leutzsch, M., Cornella, J. (2020). Radical C‒N Borylation of Aromatic Amines Enabled by a Pyrylium Reagent Chemistry – A European Journal 26(17), 3734-3743. https://doi.org/10.1002/chem.202000412
  • Krzystek, J., Schnegg, A., Aliabadi, A., Holldack, K., Stoian, S.A., Ozarowski, A., Hicks, S.D., Abu Omar, M.M., Thomas, K.E., Ghosh, A., Caulfield, K.P., Tonzetich, Z.J., Telser, J. (2020). Advanced Paramagnetic Resonance Studies on Manganese and Iron Corroles with a Formal d4 Electron Count Inorganic Chemistry 59(2), 1075-1090. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.inorgchem.9b02635
  • Li, J., Chen, J., Sang, R., Ham, W.-S., Plutschack, M.B., Berger, F., Chabbra, S., Schnegg, A., Genicot, C., Ritter, T. (2020). Photoredox catalysis with aryl sulfonium salts enables site-selective late-stage fluorination Nature Chemistry 12, 56-62. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41557-019-0353-3
  • Rams, M., Jochim, A., Böhme, M., Lohmiller, T., Ceglarska, M., Rams, M.M., Schnegg, A., Plass, W., Näther, C. (2020). Single‐Chain Magnet Based on Cobalt(II) Thiocyanate as XXZ Spin Chain Chemistry – A European Journal 26(13), 2837-2851. https://doi.org/10.1002/chem.201903924
  • Kutin, Y., Cox, N., Lubitz, W., Schnegg, A., Rüdiger, O. (2019). In Situ EPR Characterization of a Cobalt Oxide Water Oxidation Catalyst at Neutral pH Catalysts 9(11), 926. https://doi.org/10.3390/catal9110926
  • Nehrkorn, J., Bonke, S.A., Aliabadi, A., Schwalbe, M., Schnegg, A. (2019). Examination of the Magneto-Structural Effects of Hangman Groups on Ferric Porphyrins by EPR Inorganic Chemistry 58(20), 14228-14237. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.inorgchem.9b02348
  • Sidabras, J., Duan, J., Winkler, M., Happe, T., Hussein, R., Zouni, A., Suter, D., Schnegg, A., Lubitz, W., Reijerse, E.J. (2019) Extending electron paramagnetic resonance to nanoliter volume protein single crystals using a self-resonant microhelix Science Advances 5(10), eaay1394. https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aay1394
  • Cheng, J., Liu, J., Leng, X., Lohmiller, T., Schnegg, A., Bill, E., Ye, S., Deng, L. (2019). A Two-Coordinate Iron(II) Imido Complex with NHC Ligation: Synthesis, Characterization, and Its Diversified Reactivity of Nitrene Transfer and C–H Bond Activation Inorganic Chemistry 58, 7634-6744. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.inorgchem.9b01147
  • Zhao, G., Busser, G.W., Froese, C., Hu, B., Bohnke, S.A., Schnegg, A., Ai, Y., Wei, D., Wang, X., Peng, B., Muhler, M. (2019). Anaerobic Alcohol Conversion to Carbonyl Compounds Over Nanoscaled Rh-doped SrTiO3 under Visible Light The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters 10, 2075–2080. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpclett.9b00621
  • Nehrkorn, J., Veber, S.L., Zhukas, L.A., Novikov, V.N., Nelyubina, Y.V., Voloshin, Y.Z, Holldach, K., Stoll, S., Schnegg, A. (2018). Determination of Large Zero-Field Splitting in High-Spin Co(I) Clathrochelates Inorganic Chemistry 57(24), 15330-15340. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.inorgchem.8b02670
     

Publications - Dr. Edward Reijerse

  • Caserta, G., et al., Engineering an [FeFe]-Hydrogenase: Do Accessory Clusters Influence O2 Resistance and Catalytic Bias? J Am Chem Soc, 2018. 140(16): p. 5516-5526.
  • Chongdar, N., et al., Unique Spectroscopic Properties of the H-Cluster in a Putative Sensory FeFe Hydrogenase. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2018. 140(3): p. 1057-1068.
  • Dayan, N., et al., Advanced surface resonators for electron spin resonance of single microcrystals. Review of Scientific Instruments, 2018. 89(12).
  • Kinauer, M., et al., An iridium(iii/iv/v) redox series featuring a terminal imido complex with triplet ground state. Chemical Science, 2018.
  • Reijerse, E.J., et al., Direct Detection of the Terminal Hydride Intermediate in [FeFe] Hydrogenase by NMR Spectroscopy. Angew Chem Int Ed Engl, 2018. 140(11): p. 3863-3866.
  • Rodriguez-Macia, P., et al., Sulfide Protects FeFe Hydrogenases From O-2. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2018. 140(30): p. 9346-9350.
  • Rumpel, S., et al., H-1 NMR Spectroscopy of FeFe Hydrogenase: Insight into the Electronic Structure of the Active Site. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2018. 140(1): p. 131-134.
  • Saric, I., et al., Impact of disorder on formation of free radicals by gamma-irradiation: Multi-frequency EPR studies of trehalose polymorphs. Journal of Physics and Chemistry of Solids, 2018. 123: p. 124-132.
  • Sommer, C., et al., A [RuRu] Analogue of an [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Traps the Key Hydride Intermediate of the Catalytic Cycle. Angew Chem Int Ed Engl, 2018. 57(19): p. 5429-5432.
  • Sommer, C., et al., Spectroscopic investigations of a semi-synthetic [FeFe] hydrogenase with propane di-selenol as bridging ligand in the binuclear subsite: comparison to the wild type and propane di-thiol variants. J Biol Inorg Chem, 2018.
  • Lukina, E.A., et al., Spin-dependent recombination of the charge-transfer state in photovoltaic polymer/fullerene blends. Molecular Physics, 2019. 117(19): p. 2654-2663.
  • Papini, C., et al., Bioinspired Artificial FeFe -Hydrogenase with a Synthetic H-Cluster. Acs Catalysis, 2019. 9(5): p. 4495-4501.
  • Reijerse, E., et al., Asymmetry in the Ligand Coordination Sphere of the [FeFe] Hydrogenase Active Site Is Reflected in the Magnetic Spin Interactions of the Aza-Propanedithiolate Ligand. The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, 2019.
  • Sanchez, M.L.K., et al., Investigating the Kinetic Competency of CrHydA1 [FeFe] Hydrogenase Intermediate States via Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2019. 141(40): p. 16064-16070.
  • Sidabras, J.W., et al., Extending electron paramagnetic resonance to nanoliter volume protein single crystals using a self-resonant microhelix. Science Advances, 2019. 5(10): p. eaay1394.
  • Stegmaier, K., et al., Apdl and Aim32 Are Prototypes of Bishistidinyl-Coordinated Non-Rieske 2Fe-2S Proteins. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2019. 141(14): p. 5753-5765.
  • Chongdar, N., et al., Spectroscopic and biochemical insight into an electron-bifurcating FeFe hydrogenase. Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, 2020. 25(1): p. 135-149.
  • Le Vaillant, F., et al., Dialkyl Ether Formation at High-Valent Nickel. J Am Chem Soc, 2020. 142(46): p. 19540-19550.
  • Ma, Y.H., et al., Radical C-N Borylation of Aromatic Amines Enabled by a Pyrylium Reagent. Chemistry-a European Journal, 2020. 26(17): p. 3738-3743.
  • Massmig, M., et al., Carnitine metabolism in the human gut: characterization of the two-component carnitine monooxygenase CntAB fromAcinetobacter baumannii. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 2020. 295(37): p. 13065-13078.
  • Reijerse, E., J.A. Birrell, and W. Lubitz, Spin Polarization Reveals the Coordination Geometry of the FeFe Hydrogenase Active Site in Its CO-Inhibited State. Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, 2020. 11(12): p. 4597-4602.
  • Sanchez, M.L.K., et al., The Laser-Induced Potential Jump: A Method for Rapid Electron Injection into Oxidoreductase Enzymes. Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 2020. 124(40): p. 8750-8760.

Gruppenmitglieder

Gruppenleiter*innen (Vertretungen)

Dr. Edward J. Reijerse

Laborkoordination

Dr. Leonid Rapatskiy

Postdocs

Dr. Shannon Bonke (Gast)
Dr. Sonia Chabbra
Dr. Yury Kutin (Gast)
Dr. Joscha Paul Nehrkorn
Dr. Markus Teucher

EPR Forschungsgruppe am MPI CEC

Die EPR-Forschungsgruppe am MPI CEC nutzt die Elektronenspinresonanz-Spektroskopie (im Englischen electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)) zur Identifizierung und Charakterisierung paramagnetischer Zustände in Prozessen der Energiekonversion und -speicherung. Ein spezielles Augenmerk gilt katalytisch aktiven paramagnetischen Übergangsmetallen und Radikalen. Wir entwickeln und benutzen EPR-Spektrometer der neuesten Generation im Frequenzbereich von einigen GHz bis zu mehreren THz. Unsere Spektrometer erlauben eine Vielzahl spezifischer Experimente im Puls- und Dauerstrichbetrieb, darunter Doppelresonanz- und Multi-Frequenz-Experimente für Kristalle, Lösungen, Festkörper und in situ-Experimente.  

Momentan sind wir in den folgenden Forschungsfeldern aktiv:

In-situ EPR

Die wissensbasierte Veränderung und Verbesserung von Katalysatoren erforderten ein tiefgreifendes Verständnis ihrer Funktionsmechanismen.  Jedoch werden die entscheidenden katalytischen Zustände häufig erst während der Reaktion gebildet und sind somit nur unter Reaktionsbedingungen zu analysieren. Diesem Umstand begegnen wir mit der Entwicklung und Anwendung von in-situ/operando-EPR-Methoden.  Diese Studien erfordern die Konstruktion elektrochemischer Zellen innerhalb eines EPR-Probenröhrchens (siehe Abb. 2) und den Einsatz von Durchflusssystemen im EPR-Spektrometer. Dabei stehen unter anderem Reaktionen für die elektrokatalytische Wasseroxidation mit dünnen Übergangsmetallionenfilmen oder homogenen Katalysatoren im Mittelpunkt der Untersuchungen.

Kontakt: Shannon Bonke und Sonia Chabbra

Übergangsmetallionen in Hochspinzuständen

Das Ziel von EPR-Messungen an Hochspinzuständen (S > 1/2) von Übergangsmetallionen ist die Bestimmung ihrer Spinkopplungsparameter. Diese Parameter sind empfindliche Sonden der Koordinationsumgebung und der elektronischen Struktur, die sowohl die magnetischen als auch die chemischen Eigenschaften der Ionen bestimmen. Im Falle katalytisch aktiver Übergangsmetalle können die Kopplungen Informationen über den Struktur-Funktions-Zusammenhang liefern. Vor allem die Nullfeldaufspaltungsparameter der Elektronenspins liefern entscheidende Informationen. Jedoch sind diese Parameter mit herkömmlichen Spektrometern häufig nicht zugänglich. Daher entwickelt und betreibt die EPR-Gruppe neuartige Hochfrequenz/Hochfeld-Spektrometer. Diese EPR-Spektrometer werden, unter anderem für Studien an katalytisch relevanten Hochspinsystemen (u.a. FeII,III,IV, CoII, NiI, MnIII,IV) eingesetzt. Für EPR-Experimente mit Anregungsenergien bis in den THz-Bereich arbeitet die EPR-Forschungsgruppe im Rahmen des gemeinsamen Labors EPR4Energy eng mit dem Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie (HZB) zusammen.
Partner: Dr. Karsten Holldack und Dr. Thomas Lohmiller (HZB, Berlin).

Kontakt: Joscha Nehrkorn

1. Nehrkorn, J.; Holldack, K.; Bittl, R.; Schnegg, A., J. Magn. Reson. 2017, 280, 10-19.

Metalloproteine

Multifrequenz- und Multiresonanz-EPR-Techniken erlauben detaillierte Untersuchungen an funktionsbestimmenden paramagnetischen Zuständen von Metalloproteinen. Kernspins (z. B. 14/15N, 13C) bilden hervorragende Sonden zur Charakterisierung der Spindichteverteilung über den Metallcluster, insbesondere der Liganden in der ersten Koordinationssphäre (z. B. CN- und CO). Hyperfein-Spektroskopien (z.B. ENDOR-, EDNMR- und HYSCORE-Experimente) stellen die idealen Werkzeuge zur Bestimmung der charakteristischen Hyperfein- und Quadrupol- Wechselwirkungen zur Verfügung. Optimale Bedingungen für solche Experimente werden durch Einkristall-EPR-Messungen erreicht. Proteinmikrokristalle haben jedoch typische Größen im Bereich von 50 bis 200 µm. EPR-Messungen an Kristallen dieser Größenordnung in kommerziell erhältlichen EPR-Resonatoren stellen eine große Herausforderung dar. Um diese Einschränkung zu beseitigen, entwickelt unsere Gruppe Resonanzstrukturen im X-, Q- und W-Band (9,5, 34 und 94 GHz) und bis in den THZ-Bereich, die an die Größe und Form von Nanoliter-Volumenproben im X-, Q- und W-Band (9,5, 34 und 94 GHz) und bis in den THZ-Bereich angepasst sind.

Kontakt: Ed Reijerse 

2. Sidabras, J. W.; Duan, J.; Winkler, M.; Happe, T.; Hussein, R.; Zouni, A.; Suter, D.; Schnegg, A.; Lubitz, W.; Reijerse, E. J., Science Advances 2019, 5 (10), eaay1394.

EPR-on-a-Chip (EPRoC)

EPRoC are mm-sized sensors that incorporate a microwave source and detector on a surface array. This approach allows for a fundamental paradigm shift in EPR spectroscopy by facilitating in situ measurements of paramagnetic samples in environments which are difficult to access with conventional EPR setups in a cost-efficient way. We are developing EPR detection schemes that employ EPRoC sensors in a variety of different environments probing a wide range of sample morphologies in the scope of catalysis and battery research. We work on their integration in electrodes of electrochemistry experiments for the characterization of paramagnetic states in liquid solutions, e.g. in electrochemical cells, batteries or reactors. In addition, we are developing rotation-dependent EPRoC techniques for studies of microcrystals. The current generation of EPRoC sensors is capable of performing continuous wave and rapid scan EPR experiments. Partners: Prof. Dr. Klaus Lips (HZB), Prof. Jens Anders (Universität Stuttgart). Sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (Grant reference number: 03SF0565A).

Kontakt: Markus Teucher